11 Noises Dogs Hate the Most (And Why)

Dogs are the most popular and loved type of pet worldwide. They are loyal, loving, make great companions, and are usually great to live with.

But sadly, some noises really upset and scare some dogs.

If you own a dog, it’s essential to be aware of the sounds that most dogs hate so that you can help them not to freak out too much if when hear them.

Here are the 11 Noises That Dogs Hate the Most:

  1. Fireworks
  2. Thunderstorms
  3. Sirens
  4. Vacuum cleaners
  5. Lawnmowers
  6. Hairdryers
  7. Babies crying
  8. Cars honking
  9. Ringing phone 
  10. Other barking dogs
  11. People fighting

Let’s take an in-depth look at these sounds and why dogs hate them so much.

1. Fireworks

Dogs have extraordinary hearing. They can hear sounds at frequencies higher than humans and much farther away. This is why dogs are often so afraid of loud noises like fireworks.

The sound of fireworks is so loud and sudden that it can startle even the most well-trained dog. Additionally, the sound is often followed by a bright explosion of light, further increasing a dog’s anxiety.

For these reasons, it’s essential to keep your dog calm and quiet during fireworks displays. If possible, try to bring your dog inside during the festivities and provide them with a quiet and safe space to hide.

You can help your pet dog stay calm during the loudest and scariest nights of the year by taking these precautions.

2. Thunderstorms

Dogs hate thunderstorms because of the loud noise. The sound of thunder can be so loud that it scares them. But it’s not just the thunder. Dogs also hate the flashes of lightning.

Dogs are also sensitive to barometric pressure changes during a thunderstorm.

This can make them feel anxious and stressed. All these factors combined make thunderstorms one of the noises dogs hate the most.

Unfortunately, there’s not much you can do to comfort them during a storm. However, there are a few things you can do to help lessen their fears:

  • Try to act calm and confident. Your dog can pick up on your nervousness and become even more stressed if you’re anxious.
  • Provide a safe space for your dog to hide during the storm. This could be a small room or closet with no windows, anywhere that feels like a den.
  • Put on some classical music or white noise. This will help drown out the sound of the thunder.
  • Give your dog lots of cuddles and reassurance once the storm is over. With time and patience, you can help your dog overcome their fear of storms.

3. Sirens

Since dogs have extremely sensitive hearing, sirens can be quite distressing for them. The high-pitched wail of a siren can cause dogs to feel anxious and unsettled, especially as it is often associated with loud, chaotic situations.

Sirens can also be physically painful for dogs, as the sound waves can damage their delicate ear structures. The high-pitched wail of a siren is loud and jarring, making it painful for dogs to listen to.

In addition, sirens are often used to indicate an emergency, which can cause dogs to become agitated and anxious.

Due to these reasons, it’s essential to keep your dog calm and distracted when a siren sounds or if there are other loud noises.

You might try turning on the television or radio to help muffle the sound or give your dog a special treat or a pet toy to help him feel more relaxed.

If you think your dog is scared of sirens, try to calm and reassure them when you hear one. With patience and understanding, you can help your dog get through even the loudest noises.

4. Vacuum Cleaners

You’re not alone if you’ve ever wondered why your dog cowers under the couch whenever you turn on the vacuum cleaner.

The vacuum cleaner is one of the most common sources of anxiety in the home for dogs. There are a few reasons why.

First of all, vacuum cleaners are very loud, and the noise can be startling for dogs. For some dogs, the sight of the vacuum cleaner itself can be enough to trigger an anxiety response.

Secondly, the way vacuum cleaners move can feel threatening to some dogs. They may see it as a scary animal trying to attack them.

If your dog is afraid of vacuum cleaners, you can do a few things to help them feel more comfortable. For example:

  • You can try turning on the vacuum cleaner while your dog is in another room so that they can get used to the sound gradually.
  • You can also give your dog plenty of treats and praise while vacuuming to help create a positive association.
  • You might also want to try using a white noise machine or placing your dog in a crate with a toy or blanket during vacuuming.

Before we continue, here is a super cute video of some dogs going to war with noisy vacuum cleaners:

 

5. Lawnmowers

One of the most common (and potentially damaging) noise sources for dogs is lawnmowers. The loud, high-pitched sound of a lawnmower can cause serious discomfort for dogs. Prolonged exposure can even lead to hearing loss.

In addition to the noise, lawnmowers also emit vibrations that may affect a dog’s sense of balance. As such, it’s important to take care when operating a lawnmower around dogs.

Lawnmowers are often very close to the ground, which means the sound waves are more intense than those produced by other objects. Secondly, lawnmowers make a constant, monotonous noise that can irritate dogs.

If possible, put your dog in a safe, enclosed space away from the noise and vibration. And always be sure to give them plenty of warning before starting up the lawnmower.

By taking these precautions, you can help your dog avoid the potential problems associated with lawnmowers.

6. Hair Dryers

Some people love the sound of a hair dryer – it’s the sound of getting ready for a night out. But for dogs, that sound can be very unpleasant. So it’s another noise that many dogs hate.

There are a few reasons for this:

  • Hair dryers are very loud. As noted earlier, dogs have much deeper and sharper hearing than humans, so even low-level noise can be painfully loud to them.
  • Hair dryers produce a high-pitched sound. This sound is particularly irritating to dogs.
  • They make dogs uncomfortable. The sensation of heat can amplify the dog’s distress.

This doesn’t mean that you have to avoid using a hair dryer around your dog.

You can slowly expose them to the sound by turning it on for a few seconds at a time and gradually increasing the duration. With a bit of time and effort care, you can help your dog tolerate the sound of a hairdryer.

7. Babies Crying

To dogs, the high-pitched wailing of a baby can be very upsetting. In addition, dogs can pick up on parents’ emotional stress when their child is crying, making the experience even more alarming for them.

If you have a dog at home, it’s important to keep this in mind when your infant is crying and take steps to help your dog feel comfortable and safe.

Dogs may react to the sound of a crying baby by barking, pacing back and forth, or even trying to hide from the noise. In some cases, the stress of living in a noisy household can lead to serious behavioral problems in dogs.

If you think your dog is having trouble coping with the sound of a baby crying, be sure to talk to your veterinarian about ways to help them adjust.

8. Cars Honking

Dogs have an acute sense of hearing, and certain noises can trigger a strong reaction. Honking car horns are one of the most common sources of noise pollution, and it can be very startling for dogs.

The high-pitched sound is similar to the sound of a predator, and it can cause a dog to feel anxious and stressed. Additionally, car horns often blast unexpectedly, increasing the dog’s sense of unease.

If you live in a busy area or near a busy road, it’s important to provide your dog with a safe place to retreat from the noise. This could be a quiet room in your home or a secluded spot in your garden.

By giving your dog a place to escape from honking car horns, you can help reduce their stress levels and make them feel more relaxed.

If you have a dog that hates car horns, it’s essential to keep them calm and relaxed when you’re out driving.

9. Ringing Phone

Like car horns, a ringing phone can be very startling for dogs. In addition, many ringtones are high-pitched and loud, making them irritating for dogs.

If you think your pet is concerned by the sound of your phone ringing, there are a few things you can do to help them cope.

  • Try to keep your phone ring down to a minimum. This will help reduce the overall noise level in your home and make the sound less bothersome for your dog.
  • Train your dog to associate the sound of your ringing phone with something positive. For instance, a treat or a game of fetch. By pairing the sound of your phone with something that your dog enjoys, you can help them feel more relaxed and comfortable whenever they hear it.

10. Other Barking Dogs

Dogs can be very territorial, and the sound of another dog barking can trigger their instinct to protect their territory or their owners.

Additionally, dogs often bark in response to other dogs barking, creating a never-ending noise cycle. If you live in a neighborhood with lots of dogs, this can be a real problem.

There are a few things you can do to help your dog cope with the sound of other dogs barking:

  • Ensure that your pet is getting enough exercise. A tired dog is a calm dog, and by ensuring that your dog is getting plenty of exercise, you can help reduce their stress levels.
  • Provide your dog with a safe place to retreat from the noise. Try placing them in a quiet room in the house or a secluded corner in your garden.

By giving your dog a place to escape from other dogs barking, you can help reduce their stress levels and help them calm down.

11. People Fighting

The sound of people fighting can be very upsetting for dogs. Dogs are highly sensitive to the tone of our voices, and the sound of raised voices is often a sign that something is wrong.

Additionally, sounds resulting from physical violence can be very distressing for dogs. If your pet is bothered by the sound of adults fighting, you can do a few things to help them cope.

  • Try to keep your tone down when arguing with your partner. If possible, move to another room so that your dog doesn’t have to listen to raised voices.
  • Try using a calming aid such as Rescue Remedy or lavender oil. Doing so will help your dog relax.

If your dog is still having trouble coping, you may want to consult with a behaviorist or veterinarian for additional help.

By understanding the reasons behind your dog’s fear, you can take steps to help them feel more comfortable.

Leave a Comment